It is currently August 1st, 2014, 9:25 pm



Welcome
Welcome to the Italian Citizenship Message Board.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!


Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 2 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Qualifications for Italian Dual Citizenship Through Ancestry
UNREAD_POSTPosted: June 18th, 2009, 12:39 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: June 8th, 2009, 4:33 pm
Posts: 504
Location: Arizona
Preliminary Research

Before you can find out if you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis, you should know:

  • The birth dates of every relative in a direct line between you and your ancestor from Italy. It's OK if you don't have exact dates right now, but you should at least know the year.
  • The date your ancestor from Italy became a naturalized citizen of your country.

Before you start the process of obtaining dual citizenship, you should also find out whether acquiring Italian citizenship will affect your current citizenship by checking with the nearest Italian authority and/or consulting your government's citizenship laws.

Qualifying for Italian Citizenship Jure Sanguinis

To qualify for citizenship through ancestry, the applicant and his/her ascendants must meet the following basic criteria:

  • A child is born to an Italian citizen parent or a parent with the right to Italian citizenship "jure sanguinis". Henceforth this parent will be known as the Italian parent.
  • If the child was born before August 16, 1992, the Italian parent must not have taken another citizenship by naturalization at the time of the child's birth.
  • If the mother is the Italian parent, the child must have been born on or after January 1, 1948.
  • Ancestors naturalized before June 14, 1912, cannot transmit citizenship (even to children born before their naturalization). This rule is not enforced at all consulates.

See the Guide to Major Italian Citizenship-Related Laws for more information.

All conditions above must be met by every person in a direct lineage. There is no generational limit. However, while there is no generational limit to claiming Italian citizenship through "jus sanguinis" the ancestor who immigrated from Italy must have died in the Italian Peninsula or abroad after March 17, 1861, according to Italian Ministry of Interior. Any person who died prior to that date was not a Citizen of Italy, because this was before the unified nation of Italy was formed. Subsequently, that person had no ability to pass on Italian citizenship.

The common categories that follow will help you determine your eligibility. However, there may be factors not listed here that will affect your eligibility. Also please be aware that you may still be eligible even if your case cannot be found below. Please use the basic criteria above to follow your situation in detail in any case. If you think you qualify for Italian citizenship through ancestry and plan on getting your citizenship recognized by Italy, it is strongly suggested to confirm your eligibility with the appropriate consular office. (Italian Consulates in the U.S. and Italian Consulates worldwide.)

You should also note that "Italian citizen at the time of birth" is extremely important in determining whether or not you qualify. Parents who became naturalized citizens of their new country BEFORE the birth of their children lost their Italian citizenship and COULD NOT pass citizenship on to them, while parents who became naturalized AFTER the birth of their children COULD pass citizenship on to them. For example, Achille Berto immigrated to the USA in 1895. He became a naturalized US citizen in 1919 and had a son David in 1921. Citizenship was not passed to David because Achille was an American citizen (naturalized in 1919) at the time of David's birth. Using another example, Massimo Meneghetti immigrated to the USA in 1912, had a daughter Eleanor in 1924 and became a naturalized US citizen in 1936. Citizenship WAS passed to Eleanor because Massimo was still an Italian citizen when she was born.

CATEGORY #1: Your father was an Italian citizen at the time of your birth and you never renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #2: Your mother was an Italian citizen at the time of your birth, you were born after January 1st, 1948 and you never renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #3: Your father was born in your native country, your paternal grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, and neither you nor your father ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #4: Your father was born in your native country after January 1st, 1948, your paternal grandmother was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, and neither you nor your father ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #5: Your mother was born in your native country, your maternal grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of her birth, you were born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #6: Your mother was born in your native country after January 1st, 1948, your maternal grandmother was an Italian citizen at the time of her birth, and neither you nor your mother ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #7: Your paternal grandfather was born in your native country, your paternal great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, and neither you nor your father nor your grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #8: Your paternal grandmother was born in your native country, your paternal great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of her birth, your father was born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your father nor your grandmother ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #9: Your maternal grandfather was born in your native country, your maternal great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, you were born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother nor your grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #10: Your maternal grandmother was born in your native country, your maternal great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of her birth, your mother was born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother nor your grandmother ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #11: Your paternal great grandfather was born in your native country, your paternal great great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, and neither you nor your father nor your paternal grandfather nor your paternal great grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #12: Your paternal great grandfather was born in your native country, your paternal great great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, your father was born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your father nor your paternal grandmother nor your pateral great grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #13: Your maternal great grandfather was born in your native country, your maternal great great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, you were born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother nor your maternal grandfather nor your maternal great grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

CATEGORY #14: Your maternal great grandfather was born in your native country, your maternal great great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, your mother was born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother nor your maternal grandmother nor your maternal great grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis.

Document Collection

Once you've determined your eligibility, you'll need to start collecting documents, which can be a lengthy and complex process. Required documentation can vary from consulate to consulate, so it is always best to get the official list of required documents from the Italian Consulate to which you'll submit your application.


Sources: Italian Consulate, ICGS, Italian Dual Citizenship, and Expats In Italy Web sites.


Last edited by BBCWatcher on May 24th, 2010, 7:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
added link to other sticky; minor formatting clean-up


Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Qualifications for Italian Dual Citizenship Through Ance
UNREAD_POSTPosted: October 29th, 2011, 11:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: June 13th, 2009, 10:40 pm
Posts: 12655
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Keep in mind that that list of categories is not exhaustive. You may qualify even if your circumstances don't match any of them.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 2 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
suspicion-preferred